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and the revelation came out about the cia, fbi, irs, nsa a couple of initials have come up. there are real conspiracy. but when i'm also trying to do in the book is to look at conspiracy theories that say absolutely nothing true about the object of the series but all sort of thing that are true about the anxiety and the experience of the people who accept and believe and pass on the theory. the story doesn't catch on unless people feel a reason to believe it. >> what is a contemporary example. >> i think all sort of theories involve, you know, flooding again american liberty and sovereignty are going naturally appeal to people who feel like they're losing control over their live. all sort of new world order theory, for example, are metaphoric way of speaking about the losses controlled to people even the loss control is not being directed by 13 people in a secret room somewhere. this tbrun couple of decades ago. the idea that why doctors were injecting black -- there's no truth to that. ther responsible to say it was true. but it was able to catch on many had abusive treatment at the hands of hie doc
of this weekend is you can't -- one of the journalists associated with disclosures around the nsa program that is the news recently, glenn greenwald's heart was recently detained while passing through international transit on the basis of an anti-terrorism law. whether that is related to that intention is something we need to spell on very clearly with regard to legitimate aims. necessity. that is to say the information or surveillance and only be ended taken for which surveillance actions can only be undertaken when there are no clear the means of acquiring the necessary information. when the information to be acquired is of vital importance to addressing the issue at hand or vital to the investigation. adequacy. any instance of communication surveillance authorized by law must be appropriate. that means in practice that the type or form of action with regard to the surveillance, action undertaken must be strictly adequate, it must go no further than what is required to obtain relevant information. proportionality. excuse me. surveillance is a highly intrusive act, directly interferes wi
.s. embassies. on friday president obama announced proposals to change the oversight and transparency of the nsa. speakers included congressman peter king who chairs the homeland security subcommittee on counterterrorism and intelligence, former new york times reporter judith miller and fox business network host john stossel. the event was cohosted by the manhattan institute, the weekly standard and the group concerned veterans for america. >> we want to thank you all for coming. i'm not normally intimidated when i speak at these events, but now that i didn't realize gunny sergeant duff was here, now i'm very worried. [laughter] it's great to have all of you. i also want to join in thanking those of you who serve for your service and to say how pleased i am that pete king and john stossel have agreed to be here and also judy miller and gary bernstein who will be joining us for the panel. pete, when i saw -- i saw pete in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people looking around for about a week in late 2011, and pete had volunteered, reuped and gone to afghanistan then to help train the
understand it, the nsa's collection of ma tada that, the kind we've, discussing today is pursuant to 215 of the patriot act. section 215 b-2 a of the act places an important limitation on the collection, and it limit the government's ability to collect that meta data to where circumstances data in question is quote, relevant to an authorized investigate, closed quote. it's difficult to define in the abstract. it's somewhat fluid concept and one of those things that some might say i know it when i see it. but i struggle to define it. yet regardless of how difficult it might be to twin in the abstract what relevance is. continue don't you think we have left the station of relevance long before we get to the point of collecting meta data on potentially 300 million americans, and their cell phone usage? how can one get one's mind around the concept of that volume of information? meta data or otherwise, all being relevant an ongoing investigation? >> well, senator, he can chime in. noted a little bit earlier, how broad, as you noted yourself, the concept of relevance in civil discovery and ma
want to touch on the nsa and the news over the last month or so now of systematic tapping our collection of information. and again it's striking to me that there was a moment where there was phone tapping. the information was passing by and the nsa or fbi was tapping phones. now it's a different model. information, we don't know the details details but is sensibly taking from google's data center and from facebook's data center or microsoft data center. could this be -- doesn't seem -- could this be an alarming moment in the way that ways control freedom and openness of our broadband networks? >> guest: for me this is a continuation of a long history of surveillance by the united states government. it's different in degree but not actually in -- in the 20th century every single telegraph sent from united states to another country was systematically copied by our government and retained. there was widespread domestic surveillance of networks. now today we try to constrain using domestic intelligence surveillance but we have also built networks that carry our innermost thoughts
was also leaked about the section 702 on fisa which authorizes the nsa to collect the communications of the forerunners -- foreigners overseas. i am concerned about the potential damage capabilities and national security. it's appropriate to hold people accountable for holding such a massive leak to occur. we need to examine how to prevent this kind of breach in the future. in the week the president said this is an opportunity to have an open and a thoughtful debate about these issues and i offer that statement because this is a debate several of us have been trying to have for years. i will get the classified briefings but then you can't talk about them so what of the things that could be and should be discussed and where we are going to have the the date the president called for the executive branch has to be a full partner we need straightforward answers. i am concerned we are not getting them. recently the director of technology provided false testimony about the surveillance program during the senate hearing in march. his office had to remove a fact sheet for the web site after
on all the issues we're going to talk about. so let's start right off with the nsa program. i know some of it was covered in the previous panel, but i want to get into it, raj, a little bit how it actually works, and i'm talking about the metadata which was probably the biggest disclosure by edward snowden, the fact that millions and millions of records of americans' phone calls were being collected/stored. i'll let people use the word they want, by the nsa under a provision of the patriot action, section 215. raj, walk us through exactly how this program works in practice, who has access to it, what those records can be used for. >> sure. well, thanks, mike, and thanks to the aspen institute and to clark for pulling this all together. what i wanted to start out with is i firmly believe the u.s. government intelligence community, nsa in particular needs to be as transparent as possible consistent with our need to protect national security. and, obviously, it's that last piece that's the rub, and it makes it so difficult to talk about classified programs. but i would like to be as inform
that the nsa is serving just terrorists, because you've got homeland security saying the tea party is the terrorist. as soon as they've got the information, why do you think the left doesn't care? the left knows the nsa isn't watching silicon valley. the left is watching conservatives. every bit as much as the irs targeted conservatives, and we've got to have petitions to stand up and tell the truth on this. darrell issa is doing a remarkable job on this in congress. we need to support them. we need to support politicians like ted cruz. we need to acknowledge the need to republicans, john mccain, lindsey graham, an unfortunate the marco rubio's, if that's the republican party, conservatives do not need the republican party. [applause] >> i'm from highway 61 and again in los angeles. i've got to question. the first is given the history of failure of socialism and communism, what is the true psychological motivation of today's socialists is don't recommend the economic system? and secondly, would you be willing to be interviewed for my new movie? >> i would be delighted to be in your
want to touch on the nsa and the news over the last month or so now of systematic tapping or collection of information to begin again, it is striking to me there was a moment when, you know, it was a phone tapping. the information was passing by and the nsa or the fbi or whatever jurisdiction was wiretapping phones and now what is a different model. the flow of information, we don't know the details but it is ostensibly taking it from the datacenter or from the microsoft data center. where does this -- could this be the tipping point on this moment in the way that we treat -- they control the freedom and openness of the network? >> guest: for me this story is just a continuation of a long story of surveillance by the government. it's different in degrees, but not actually in kind. in the 20th century, every single telegraph sent from the united states to another country was systematically copied by the government and maintained. there was widespread domestic surveillance of networks. now today we try to constrain using oh-la-la on our domestic intelligence surveillance, but we have also
up on your firewall, i do want to touch on the nsa and the news over the last month or so now and systematic tapping her collection of information. again, it is striking to me there was a moment where was its own tapping. the information was passing by and the fbi, whether court jurisdiction or not was tapping phones. now it's a different model. we don't know the details, but it's just taking it from google's data center, from facebook status and are. where does this -- could this be -- could this be a tipping point of an alarming moment in the way we treat and control freedom and openness of our networks? >> guest: for me, the story is a continuation of a long history of surveillance by the united states government. it is different in degree, but not in kind. in the 20th century, every single telegraphs and from the united states to another country was systematically copied by our government and retained. there was widespread domestic surveillance of networks. now today we try to constrained using law, domestic intelligence surveillance. but we've also built networks that car
: with the revelations about the nsa, irs come in your view should we be paranoid? >> guest: i never want to encourage people to be paranoid because that's a clinical term. it is certainly good to be skeptical and suspicious a lot of the time. i am all for good, solid investigative journalism is grounded in facts and evidence. >> host: jesse walker, who was one of your favorite conspiracies or leaders from our history? >> guest: well, some of the interesting things in the book are people you wouldn't expect. for example, john quincy adams was very much afraid of freemasons and their influence in the united states. there is a quote from him in there that in the election of 18 dirty too, saying the important thing isn't whether andrew jackson or henry clay wins the election. it's what we can do to stop the encroaching power. so you are surprised to hear them discussing any terms. the most familiar figure -- i wouldn't call him a favorite because he was a terrible person, but there is a guy named shawn tied, who in the 70s was on the circuit in churches saying he was a former are and telling these very e
lawsuits that have been filed on the nsa program. we have congress holding hearings yesterday finally saying, wait a minute, that's not the law i thought i signed including the author of the bill, mr. sensenbrenner. i find it rather troublesome when i find that that white house press be secretary, mr. carney, goes to such lengths to say he's not a human rights act visits, he's not a dissident, and he's not a whistleblower. well, who made him king of the human rights community, right? i think -- >> [inaudible conversations] >> excuse me, i can't let this stand without giving neil mcbride, who has criminally charged snowden -- >> that's why -- >> -- a chance to respond. >> i have to say, i think it's a bad message for us to send for people who decide to take the law into their own hands they're doing a public service. >> can i think when the system has not worked. we have sued seven times to try to get the surveillance program before a proper court. we were kicked out of court. the clapper v. amnesty international where the justice department lawyer said it was a cascade of speculation
who you'll hear from later. general hayden was the director of the cia and the nsa. he's now a principal at the chertoff group, and he's going to talk to us about the threat as he sees it, and then we'll open it up to q&a, so we'll be very happy to hear your thoughts, and i know he'll give you some of his answers. so without further ado, i want to introduce general haden. [applause] general hayden. >> well, good morning, and thanks for the chance to chat with you a bit today. as carie suggested, i'll try to limit my transmission up here to about 20 minutes and then leave about 15 minutes for any questions or comments that you might have. as already suggested, my purpose here is what my army buddies used to call the briefing with the big hand and the little map, all right? i get to do the strategic overview. and what you have following me are people far more expert than i in the specific definitions of the problem and specific responses to the problems that i think we're all going to identify here today. folks from government, folks from industry, federal government, state and
for intelligence information from the entire intelligence community. they pull in from the cia, nsa, fbi, all the different intelligence agencies. then put together a suggestion about how to protect yourself against these threats. that's similar to the way the nrc does it. in practical terms, that's what i would envision. >> i want to make a quick point about the nrc. we're a nuclear company. we have brought in a lot of talent from our nuclear business to help mature part of our i.t. and compliance program. and we have brought their discipline, practices, and the processes to our program. and it's helped us mature, i think, and evolve to a very disciplined state. they have been used to operating under that level of prescription and scrutiny for many years. they have a lot of practices we have been able to bring in. it's a model we have looked at to help us at other part of our company. >> i would say the e sock is well positioned to be that meduater for us. with the involvement already the assurances that we now have on the separation between information sharing and enforcement. it would be a
if you look upon it favorably. >> bob? do you have anything to add about our wonderful nsa state and how -- >> well, i want to -- anthonyys judgment that i believe what has been revealed recently truly is unprecedented. the power of the government, with current technology, to know where we are, and to a very high degree what we're doing every single minute of the day and night, is the stuff of which novels might have been made but it would have been too ridiculous for any novelist to embrace. it would have required to great 0 suspension of belief by the readers, and a reality that grows steadily worse. there is now a huge industry valued at something in the neighborhood of 80 to $100 billion annually. we don't really know because it's black budgets. and the people in this industry, which involves hundreds of thousands, and perhaps even millionsed of employees of i.t. companies, are working fulltime to strengthen, to widen, to intensify, all the techniques already developed, to know even more about every one of us and, endearing everyone else on the earth that they can know about. and wit
the u.s. may be violating international law through its use of nsa surveillance programs. she spoke as a representative of a group that has formulated new principles aimed at protecting people from unwarranted electronic surveillance. speaking at part of an event, this is 40 minutes. >> excuse me, hello. if even could come to the forward of the room, please, you can bring your food, your drinks. leads sit down, we're going to -- please sit down, we're going to get started. [inaudible conversations] like herding cats. so i wanted to welcome everyone to the new america foundation. i'm thomas gideon, i'm the director of technology at the open technology institute. oti, as some of you may know, is an operational think tank that brings many disciplines together to collaborate on improving access to and control of open technologies. in supporting one of those disciplines, the one directly tasked with the research and development of open technologies such as the commercial wireless project, i especially appreciate the purpose of this event and this event series, this wider multicity, multi
of the consulate in munich it calls for the abolition of the nsa. not reform or scaling back. the last year of the 20th anniversary with our alexis day tocqueville ward, a d.c. parallel for hope between the protest that led @ the protest that led to the eventual fall of the berlin wall? or what we can drawn today? >> we can certainly hope to move in that direction. one of the advantages the east germans had by the 1980's was ideological support that totally evaporated over the course of time. of course, there were many people who went along to get along but they could build day movement for the opposition but not by offical excuses and the greatest difficulty is a great many americans are using it. many more protests i hope there will be in the held at 800 cities in every city in america. people can now and said no. we will not tolerate this house we will oppose you with every ounce of this totalitarian measure. with david do is say yes. you are right. with david hold a hearing in they would introduce bills out of recognition along the way. then they would come forward with their reform tha
wonderful nsa state? >> i would second anthony's judgment that i believe what's then revealed recently truly is unprecedented. the power of the government with the current technology to know where we are into a very high degree what we were doing every single minute of the day it would have been ridiculous for any novelist to embrace. >> it's not simply a reality but it is one that grows steadily worse. there is now a huge industry valued at something in the neighborhood of 80 to $100 billion annually. we don't really know. the people in the industry which involves hundreds of thousands of perhaps even millions of employees and i.t. companies are working full-time to intensify all of the techniques developed to know even more about everyone of us and everyone else on the are at that they can know about. and with the modern technology most people are in line to be watched with a degree of scrutiny that no one dreamed of until quite recently. so what you might say. many americans are saying so what. i don't care. that i would say is an extraordinarily stupid attitude to take. the fact that you
to defend weeks later why the nsa program has expanded so much pain when you want to get the allies outside saying he essential as we stand firm against the islamic terrorism after the president says the war is almost over. and being in congress, i support the nsa program. we went through the nuances and the details. but apart from that or maybe in congress and apart from a better america, you know, blame america first crowd that may be in congress i think one of the main reasons why we have a hard time maintaining support for the programs such as the nsa is because the president has undercut us and manly speaks in a schizophrenic way. he should be the one out there on national television. he should be the one out there instead of talking about phony scandals he should be talking about the phony speeches that he's made about islamic terrorism and tell us why the nsa program is so important. [applause] so we are really against a situation where the people are being considered, republicans and some conservatives are defending a program of the left-of-center president refuses to defend himself
snowden, i was leading the fight in congress to take the nsa to task on warrant was spying on americans. i wrote the legislation to repeal the patriot act and the fisa amendmentamendment s act. throughout my career, throughout this campaign, i have been advancing the bold idea that we need to extend the american dream to all americans. bold ideas people be talking about tonight >> moderator: thank you very much. next opening statement, the speaker of the silly, sheila oliver. oliver: i appreciate opportunity to be here this evening to engage in dialogue with my opponents in this quest to fill the seat of the late senator frank lautenberg. it might hope that the voters of new jersey listen intently this evening as we focus on issues that are not just important to capitol hill, but those issues that are important to the people that live in this state. every u.s. senator connie of an obligation to engage in moving the agenda of the nation forward. but you should also use that representation to help move an agenda forward for the state of new jersey and its citizens. as a legislative leader, i
would not overestimate the economic nsa. to me, the biggest thing to keep in mind that we talk about liquefied natural gas exports is that they made for the broader system of global trade, energy and jan mat. the united states prevailed over china and the world trade organization in getting it -- in pursuing its restrictions on raw material exports. we continue to pursue efforts to reduce chinese restrictions on rare earth exports. there are legal technicalities that might allow us to say we will restrictions even though you can't, but at a minimum political level that's a tough argument to kerry. if we said we were strict experts to help our economy manufacturing reduce environmental impacts, we basically take the chinese threesome of a copy paste inserting different materials into the equation. i think that would put us in a very bad position. it's worth remembering despite all the euphoria, we still remain dependent on global market for our economic security. >> you mentioned with some optimism that need for additional infrastructure to make widespread use of natural gas vehicles
global cyber noise. i mean, his release of alleged nsa hacking of chinese computers was timed precisely a few days before our president met with the chinese president, where they would begin an honest dialogue about appropriate cyber behavior. and that, of course, turned into mutual recriminations as snowden's allegations allowed the chinese to pretend that there was some actual equivalent see, which between americans and chinese cyber behavior. so industry will have to do a lot more up here in their accustomed to doing down here. the government will be permanently late later by the we got to government speakers appear, and it doesn't offend them. i was government for 39 years. i tried my best, but i know culturally, politically, philosophically we are going to be late. the good news is, industry understands this a great deal. i've been out of government now almost five years and i've seen a migration of industry appreciation of the problem. when i first started working with the chertoff group after left government, we got to talk to ceos and css and cios. we talk to ceos now. we talk t
an amendment that would bar the nsa from using funds to collect phone and data records from citizens not subject to an investigation. the amendment which was opposed by house leader john boehner in the white house was defeated by a vote of 205-217. this town hall held in marshall michigan is just over an hour. [applause] >> hello everyone. he is my chief of staff. he doesn't just work for me so if you have questions or concerns here in the district you can always reach ben. he is primarily in my grand rapids office my main district office. you can find that on my web site. we have a satellite office in battle creek so if there is something you would like to schedule or an appointment you would like to schedule contact her grand rapids office so we can make sure we have someone down here to meet with u.s. well in calhoun county. by district director is not here today but he is also a valuable resource. if you want to contact my grand rapids office to reach him please feel free to do so. he is always around except for today but for a good cause he is not here today. but, he is a great
the nsa a is not operating these microphones clearly. [laughter] or maybe barack obama is. that's a good point. it's wonderful to be here tonight. wonderful to be here at the steam boat institute. i think it's long past time that the aspen institute got a doze of truth and reality and facts. [applause] and we're thrilled to be part of that effort here tonight. we thought we would do a cup of things. we want to talk about current events, but the most important current event in our lives in our family has been the fact that my dad was bless -- we were all blessed. my dad was a recipient a of new heart a little over a year ago. [applause] and his story, you know, he talked about his first campaign for office when he was elected, and 1967, when i was running the first time was also the first time he had a heart attack, and i've been going back for reasons you can imagine looking at some old news clippings about political campaigns in wyoming, and came across one where my dad was asked about his heart attack in 1978. after he had the attack and decided he was going stay in the race he was int
he will hear from colleagues about the ratification of the nsa prism as that continues to be a topic of concern in europe. russia will only be a topic and, of course, syria, egypt, the middle east and the unrest there. so i believe you'll see every fool some bilateral conversation, a more dynamic regional conversation with the nordic states, and i think it's an excellent preparation to get the president ready as he travels to st. petersburg to meet with his g20 colleagues. matt, i will let you take the baton. >> let me introduce matt will quickly. matt goodman here at csis hold our william simon chair in political economy. the simon chair examines current issues in international economic policy with a particular focus on the asia-pacific but i should also say that matt previously served as the white house coordinator for the east asia summit for the asia-pacific summit, but he also served as director for international economics on the nsc staff and was responsible for the g20, g8, and other international forums. with that i would like to introduce my colleague, matt goodman. >> thank
. and other issue we can talk about the nsa and the rest of it, if you want. but i do think that he is focused on the longer term and his greatest hope for had hymn. he's remembered as something more than the first african-american president. and so there will be a series of stutter steps. it will frustrate people across the spectrum at various points, but i think we'll look back on this period as an exciting and important one in our national life. so with that, thank you so much for listening. [applause] >> are we about on time? was i close? >> i think we actually have time. i don't need this; is that right? >> he was give megathe hook and i didn't get it. >> i'll assume you can hear me. we thank jonathan alter columnist for bloomberg. and the new book you'll buy and those in tv land. "the center holds: obama and his enemies." it's time for the audience questions. we have a number of questions. let me start with one of these. we were talking before the presentation tonight about a question a lot of people ask about the president, which is his general asset. in the book you write very interest
of them? >> those that go to work, you say where they get the people that joined in the nsa? where do they round these people up? the same type of people from the bottom of society lowlife middle aged people speaking to would drop whenever they we're doing previously to put on a tacky uniform to go to the neighbors 30 laundry and serve a useful purpose in the process. this little bit of power that they have got holding it over others makes your life miserable and withal bureaucracy once created, it grows. bureaucracies like that, this is true of all of washington you have to kinds of people in the world. those that believe in those the believe enforce that are drawn to the government with the power of the state comes out of the barrel of a gun. it at some point with the people that work for the government for whatever reason they do not want to be there any more. we are also reaching that tipping point in the united states. >> host: who are your political heroes? >> i don't believe in politics as a way to relate to other human beings is institutionalize a illegalized coercion. but peo
general counsel for the nsa, advisor to eric holder, acting assistant attorney general for national security come and special counsel to the fbi director. his predecessor at the nctc is mike leiter. mike was the second director of the national counterterrorism center from 2007-2011. and he is now senior counselor to the ceo of the data analytic company, and is also a national security analyst for nbc news. so why don't we begin with a very broad question? and that is, what is the current state of the threat from terrorism? >> where does it emanate from and how serious is it? matt, why don't we start with you? >> thanks a lot, ryan. and it's great to be. it's always daunting to talk like us anlike you said we talka lot of these subjects today and follow john mclaughlin, but i'll give it a shot under over to you, mike. i would say right off the top the thread is very different now from a counterterrorism perspective from what it was 10 years ago certain and really even four years ago. speaking of in a couple of different levels. first, as has been noted, the threat from core al qaeda
the bill barring the nsa from using funds to collect the data records from citizens on the subject and investigation. >> she's my chief of staff. he doesn't just work for me. if you have questions or concerns here in the district you can always reach ben. he is primarily in my grand rapids office. you can find that on my website, amash.house.gov. we have a satellite office in battle creek so if there's something you would like to schedule, an appointment you'd like to schedule if you contact the grand rapids office we can make sure we have someone here to meet with you as well in calhoun county. my district director is jordan bush. he is also a valuable resource. if you want to contact my grand rapids office, feel free to do so. he's always around except for today but for good cause he's not here today. but he is a great resources with any number of issues. i do telephone town halls from time to time. so if you would like to get out those phone calls please let the staff know. you can talk to ben before you leave. as we do those from time to time that gives you another way to stay
of the nsa recent advances apparently haven't been put in place at the time. they called and they said okay. ocean, desert and i said definitely ocean. desert will kick up radioactive dust and pose a danger to the community. they said fantastic. they called me back a week or two later and said we looked into it. it's too expensive to fill the test so we have to crash the plane in the desert. can you come up with a reason that we shouldn't put it in the ocean? and decide what about making sure we don't harm fish? i said what about saying they're visiting the area and this would cause an international integration? are the with the fish? [laughter] the lesson you should take from this is television advisers, and dramas do not have a lot of influence. [laughter] >> on behalf of the council and everyone here tonight, thank you for speaking. [applause] >>> due to the recent discussion on student loan rates in congress, for the next hour book tv brings you portions of author presentations about the cost of higher education. we start with a panel from june that included william bennett come author
one story, i was done. 193 stories. irs, benghazi, nsa, wiretapping, nah, what is it, too difficult? when they do the wiener kind of stuff, you know, i don't know what to suggest. where republicans are concerned? it is such a double standard. i don't have the numbers, but we covered it, and there's reports on this. when there is a scandal involving a democrat, it is stunning to see the degree to which they go to say it's not a democrat. now, the abc's of journalism, it's there a story on elected officials, and you, know, the next thing as important as this first name and last name is the party affiliation. story after story after story, and we have seen if with one scandal after another after another whether the mayor is going to jail or whether you're the governor of illinois, you know, it just goes on and on and on. they just obliterate the label, but if you're a republican, it leads with republican. you see that coverage. it is stunning the double standard. this is something republicans have to live with, but republicans are treated this way because they allowed the media to trea
't move forward with this trait until we get much more rigorous both transparency on the nsa programs, but in the case of germany a new agreement that u.s. will not spot on germany. so this is not going away. it's not even going away after the german election, quite frankly. it will continue. it needs to be taken very strangely. there is not a real breach in confidence and trust that we have to manage, and work through so we can get back to working on the bilateral engagement and agenda. and first and foremost is that trade investment. we can't allow this issue to sideline the. and right now it has the potential to do that. so he certainly will hear it, and he made if he has that opportunity to have a sideline discussion which i assume you will with chancellor merkel in the corridors of the g20. he may hear additional words on that. >> well, the revelations of the program are i think hard to underestimate as a blow to u.s. credibility, as a moral leader in many places. and it plays imperfectly to the hands of the russians into the chinese, i think. just the fact that coming the united
: to pick up on your firewall, want to touch on the nsa. the news over the last month saw now have a systematic, the tapping or collection of information. again, there was a moment where phone tapping, the information was passing by. tapping phones. now it's a different model. the flow of information has pulled. we don't know the details. it is essentially taking it from the data center. where does this -- i mean, could this be -- could this be a tipping point? an alarming moment? >> guest: this is a continuation of a long history of surveillance by the united states government. it's different in degree, but not actually in kind. in the 20th-century every single telegraphs and from the united states to another country with systematically copy. now we tried to a constrain using law, domestic intelligence but we have also built networks that carry our air most thousand dreams in ways that telephone calls may not have. so we know that the nsa in the past to systematically copied wholesale all internet transmissions going through large exchange points. to save a copy for themselves. th
but members of congress to set i want to use myself. i called the nsa for national security agency and they came to my office and a private limit and i said tell me the living dead was involved in this. tell me what is the bottom line with this security aspect. they went ahead and they looked at this and we went to a room which was in the capital capital and that's a private room nothing bounces in and nothing bounces up and i won't reveal the information today. security in the capital but they said it's okay to do these if we do them this way. doesn't matter which company does them. the israeli-based company which in fact or the lgc american company it doesn't matter which one. if you do it this way it's involved this way and that's all i can say about it that way are okay. we made a decision to award the contract of what we do with the contract the ceo of the house the administrator of the house, what we do for the contract was that the providers do a survey. the providers were sprint verizon and at&t. they were five of them and i can't remember the other two. they would sign do
of the government's top secret agency, the nsa, the national security agency which is a number of times larger than the cia, whistle blowers like william and others who joined the nsa. the national security agency they were deeply concerned about national security and wanted to serve their country and started to speak out about what was doing after they tried the channel within the agency. deeply cell phoned about -- concerned about, for example, surveillance of american. they were finding programs were developed to not improve national security but data mine americans. as they spoke out, one by one the prosecution or persecution in the case of william. authorities raided his house, had him at gunpoint. he was a diabetic am pee too. they were charged. under the obama administration, there have been more whistle blowers charged than in all past presidential administrations combined. it's a very serious issue. which brings us to the case of bradley manning. the young soldier who went to iraq and now plead guilty to having released hundreds of thousand of not millions of pages of documents to wicky le
which is the nsa who every three months is going to this fisa court which is a secret court which no one can appeal to. and they're getting warrants to get cell phone records basically every single american, okay? you have an fbi who believes that and has went to court to say that they do not, they don't need, basically they don't need a warrant to put a gps tracking device on your car. you've got an irs whose official position is that they don't need a warrant to check your e-mail. this, of course, is that same irs that has no compunction about using -- abusing their authority. they have targeted tea party groups and so far nobody has really paid a price for that. and so read the situation that i find, i think i'm and i might be the only person who feels it is about nothing is being done to rein in these government agencies. and so from my perspective it's like, well, the only privacy really have is what the government says that you have to. and i was really pumped when you voted against -- that was awesome, i was really happy about that. i was really disappointed that you voted against
to work with x you should work with our company than the nsa gets everything. that makes future cooperation with the government on the national security issues in accordance with the law much more difficult. so all three of those have a jury is impact on the national security. >> we have seen in response to be snowden weeks the al qaeda and affiliated groups speaking to change on the tactics looking to see what they can learn in the press and change how they communicate to avoid detection. >> i think there is a lot of mystery about what the in ctc -- nctc does in the counterterrorism world. let's talk about the central role that it has. one of the changes that happened on your watch was the calling of names for the targeted coming from the national security council and the pentagon to being centralized that nctc. there's been a lot of controversy about that. can you to the extent you can talk about what was the role in developing and calling the list for the killings? >> i will narrow that a bit. it's a criticism we have heard from congress and elsewhere. i see eric l. tabare an
saying we can't move forward with this trade until we get much more rigorous both transparency on the nsa programs, but in the case of germany, a new agreement that the u.s. will not spy on germany. so this is not going away. it's not even going away after the german election, quite frankly. it will continue. it needs to be taken very seriously. there is now a real breach in confidence and trust that we have to manage and work through so we can get back to working on the bilateral engagement and agenda, and first and foremost is that ttip, is that trade investment. we can't allow this issue to sideline that. and right now, you know, it has the potential to do that. so he certainly will hear it, and he may, if he has an opportunity to have a sideline discussion which i assume he will with chancellor merkel in the corridors of the g20, he may hear additional words on that. >> well, it's a -- the revelations of the program are, i think, are hard to underestimate as a blow to, you know, u.s. credibility as a moral leader in places. and it plays perfectly into the hands of the russians and to
of tennessee. she's also chair of the judicial conference of the nsa's committee on the budget, and so is well and deeply first and funding issues faced by the court and can answer i believe many of the implicit questions raised in the opening statement from both myself and senator sessions. judge gibbons, please proceed. >> chairman coons, senator sessions, members of the subcommittee, i appear before you as chair of the judicial conference committee on the budget. the judiciary very much appreciates the invitation to discuss the financial crisis facing the courts. senator coons, i am pleased that judge is a known circuit are here today. i see judge ted mickey. there's the judge from your home state. the third circuit itself -- as rest of the judiciary but it's within the circuit coordination and efforts to address the current crisis has been stellar. i also would like to recognize judge john bates right here behind me, the new director of the administrative office of the court who comes after serving on the d.c. federal district court. the $350 million, 5% across the board sequestration cuts
the ramification of the nsa/prism issue as that continues to be a topic of concern in europe. russia will clearly be a topic ask be, of course, syria, egypt, the middle east and the unrest there. so i believe you'll see a very fulsome bilateral conversation within the nordic state, and i think it's an excellent preparation to get the president ready as he travels to st. petersburg to meet with his g8 -- g20, excuse me, colleagues. and, matt, i'll let you take the baton. >> let me introduce matt really quickly. matt goodman holds our william simon chair in political economy. the sigh hon chair examines current issues this international economic policy with a lahr focus on the asia pacific. but i should also say that matt previously served as the white house coordinator for the east asia summit, for the asia-pacific summit many, but he also served as director on the nsc staff and was responsible for the g20, g8 and other international forums. and with that, i'd like to introduce my colleague, matt goodman. >> thank you, ann i drew. hank, heather. so the president will be participating in the eighth
science, computer science. don't think for a minute that the nsa is surveying just terrorists, because you have homeland security saying the tea party is the terrorists. as soon as they have the information, why do you think the left doesn't care? the left knows the nsa isn't watching silicon valley. the left is watching conservatives. every bet as much as the irs targeted conserve -- conservatives. darrell issa is doing a remarkable job in congress. we need to support him, ted cruz, acknowledge that the me-too republicans, the john mccains, lindsey grahams and the mark -- marco rubio, if that's the republican party conservatives do not need the republican party. [applause] >> hi, joel. >> i am joel gilbert from highway 61 in entertain independent los angeles. i have two questions. given the history of failure of socialism and communism, what this try psychological motivation of today's socialists to still recommend this economic system, and secondly, would you be willing to be interviewed for my new movie? >> i've seen your movies before. be delighted. the appeal of socialism is very stro
the relationship, especially in light of what has happened with edward snowden and the nsa that relationship between the foreign spacing components of the american government, and its relationship to owners and operators of critical infrastructure who traditionally operate domestically. >> there are a few trend that are important, underpinnings of your question. first of all, over the last decade, increasingly the department of defense relies on facilities here in the united states in order to operate our forces abroad, and so when you look at the dependence of dod facilities, military bases here, on privately owned infrastructure, especially the electric grid, you can see the imperative for dod to be able to partner effectively, not only with industry to assure the flow of those vital electricity services, but of course also with the department of energy and the department of homeland security, which will always be in the lead for the federal government. never the department of defense force these kinds of issues. so, building industry collaboration under the leadership and the federal team
are at dhs the last to use the push of ministers are we aware of this nsa phone data collection operation? >> guest: i was not. >> host: next to war in arkansas, democrats line. >> caller: yes, my problem is that everyone is mad about the tsa but i love them. yes it's an inconvenience but would you rather be in the air at 10000 feet, 5000 feet whatever it is in your plane blows up? yes they needed to overhaul their system and get better employees but we need them. >> guest: thank you for that point and that is exactly right. we all have to have certain things to keep us safe. for example some people might not like to stop at a red light in an intersection but we recognize that we need some way of coordinating car traffic at an intersection. some trade-offs in convenience are necessary for public safety. your point is exactly right which is very few people i think would want a complete no security approach to one of the most repeated threats of al qaeda. the question is whether we should have some security and how can we make it better and you said it very well which is there is an opportu
at the fisa debate. a lot of people looked at other stories we wrote about fisa, and about nsa spying and that sort of thing. it put a human face, i think, on the otherwise inpenetrable government bureaucracy system going on. nobody ever really stands exactly -- don't understand what is going on when nsa decides to tap someone's phone. and it was a nice way to sort of show that to people. >> i agree with john when he mentioned that people seem to be more plugged in to politics now than they have ever been. there are part of the explosion of media outlet on capitol hill covering politics since 2006, 2007.ort what you see is that people are only going places that reenforce their already-held opinions. so it's important -- we all -- all of our organizations do really well, is to provide an independent viewpoint or independent look at what is going on in in washington that is simplified enough for the common person, the nonpolitical person to understand but nuanced enough that, you know, you're not boiling it down to something where they're not getting anything out of it. like, i was talk
collection. and what we are trying to do is create another set of people also associated with nsa and cyber, whose mission is a defense, development of key devotees for the u.s. military and in the defense of the nation to be the last thing i will close on if it is the defense of the nation as you participate in an icy some of the names it's very important and the governments can help and need to help but another thing that has to happen is many of the civil networks are so purely protected themselves that it is very difficult for us to claim that we come to their aid. they need to be protected themselves and that gets to a much bigger problem in the society and that is that cybersecurity is under invested. there is a market failure in the cybersecurity field and those of you have companies to try to market products for cybersecurity is a hard slog to a lot of people don't want to spend a lot of money and acknowledge if they have a problem and so a lot of our critical businesses are more mobile than they should be and what should happen is they should take the steps to harden themselves and
of the recent nsa disclosures that we're learning about is, you know, if you don't have members of congress and the u.s., the american people knowing about what the government is doing and the kind of extraordinary power they want to make the country safe, then, you know, you do risk the sense this will just be the kind of permanent war that will never end, and you will never be able to grapple, and that creates a national security bureaucracy. but that said, the idea that you just want to -- you know, if you were to say that we should repeal that aumf, then you would effectively be saying you don't think there currently is a war, and as tom said, the enemy gets a vote, and they're still at war with us. that's kind of where i'm at. >> let me just throw into the discussion, i'm pretty sure president obama suggested before the closing of the diplomatic outposts that the authorization for the use of military force, that congress should consider repealing it. but again, that -- >> or modifying it. >> or modifying it. very different, i guess. the idea of repealing it would be based on the narrat
the former nsa official turned whistleblower thomas brake here at a press club luncheon, and he said that once employees are seeking to retain or renew security clearances and they're interviewed by investigators, one of the questions that they're asked at least some of the time is if you have ever had unlawful contact with a reporter. not unauthorized contact, but any unauthorized contact. to a lot of us, that was disturbing because we thought by merely asking that question in that context they're sending the message, intentional or not, that speaking to the press offline is forbidden and could even make you a security risk. now, obviously, the bradley manning and edward snowden leaks have raised the temperature on issue considerably, particularly in the security agencies. the no leaks message was made in a really hard core way. in a june 2012 defense department document, it was about a so-called insider threat program, and it was obtained recently by mcclap news, and it said, quote: leaking is tantamount to leaking the enemies of the united states, closed quote. now, if that was eq
on the climate. >> host: what about the nsa issue that nfacing? >> guest: it's an interesting issue that concerns me but interesting that when i'm home i don't hear it much. i hear it from a small group of people but when i'm at the coffee shop that one doesn't come up. the irs one comes up a lot of though. >> host: jake in massachusetts on the independent line the republican of nebraska is the guest. >> caller: people think they need to make a lot more money than they should. in that case they should get a good tax credit to the people working good full-time jobs but not making a bunch of money. so, people would want to get a part-time job but not such a great job. it would put more money in their pockets at. and i notice when people get their tax returns and what not, they put all that money back and buy a new tv or read a4a pity the the what help the economy. it's just i talk to people and they think they should be making 20 or $30 an hour because they think they deserve that. but really what i think is if they give a good tax break to the part-time and the people who may be are making the $40
the relationship especially in light of what's happened with edward snowden and the nsa, that relationship with, between the foreign-facing come poems, the national security facing come poems of the american be government and its relationship to owners and operators of critical infrastructure who traditionally operate domestically? >> well, there are two trends, scott, that are important. upside pinnings of your -- underpinnings of your question. first of all, oh the last decade -- over the last decade increasing lu the department of defense relies on facilities here in the united states in order to operate our forces abroad. and so when you look at the dependence of dod facilities, military bases here on privately-owned infrastructure, especially the electric grid for purposes of today, you can see the imperative for dod to be able to partner effectively not only with industry to assure the flow of those vital electricity services, but, of course, also with the department of energy and the department of homeland security which will always be with in the lead for the federal government, never t
or proprietary. a couple of weeks you we had a former nsa official turned whistleblower thomas drake here at a press club luncheon. and he said that when federal employees obtain or renew security clearances, and there are interviewed by investigators, one of the questions the past, at least some of the time, is whether the employee has ever had unauthorized contact with a reporter. not unauthorized conduct involving classified or proprietary information, but any unauthorized contact. to a lot of us that was disturbing because we thought by merely asking that question in the context, they're sending the message, intentional or not, that speaking to the press off line is forbidden and could even make you a security risk. obviously, the bradley manning and edward snowden leaks have raised the temperature on this issue considerably, particularly in the security agency. the nl the message was made in a really hard-core way in a june 2012 defense department document, about a so-called insider the program and it was obtained recently by the news and it said quote hammer this fact tone, leaking
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